Don’t Push Sales, Build Relationships

 

Sales techniques can be an overwhelming process to learn as well as time consuming, especially for new hires with no prior experience. However if your people are trained right and have the right access to tools, your business will grow exponentially. The golden rule applies “take care of your employees, and they will take care of your customers”.

A huge factor in training sales new hires is being able to teach them to solve problems. You don’t want them out their just trying to sell products. Yes, selling products creates more money in your pocket, however you will never broaden your sales area and will continue to sell to random new consumers. Stress the importance of “repeat customers” as this builds relationships and will bring in more clients by word of mouth.

Another reason why repeat customers should be a key point in training is because it helps your new hires to learn how to deal with problems that arise. For example, if one of your long term consumers is dissatisfied with a certain product they will be hesitant to keep buying products if they do not receive any help or guidance in using this. Learning how each company goes about this process is something that should be covered in a solid sales on-boarding program.

For example, if I am a loyal customer to ABC store and decide to buy a new lawn mower from their collection, but when I get home I can’t figure out how it works. This will automatically put a small dent in my relationship with the store. However, if the sales person in the store taught me all the tricks to the trade before purchasing and offered assistance after purchasing, it would create a positive impact on the store and sales person which would keep me inclined to keep coming back.

Any sales person needs to have exceptional communication skills; this does not mean being able to talk to strangers or pushing a product onto a passerby. A good sales person will not only be able to see a product but will be able to develop a relationship with their customer in the meantime. For example if your trying to sell a computer program to a customer and they give you ab obstacle such as “I don’t use the computer much, my wife take care of the technology”, don’t write them off and ask to speak with their wife, this will create a damper on a relationship. Instead offer to teach them how it works or play around with the software until their wife is free to engage.

Teach your new hires the old saying “your always seven people away from knowing everybody”. Meaning that one satisfied customer can potentially bring in seven more customers. However, one bad experience can lead to seven or more disgruntled customers. Think about it like this, if you have great service somewhere, you don’t go around bragging about it. But if you have a really bad experience somewhere you tell everyone and maybe even write a review online. Always try to fix a bad situation, don’t ignore it because it’s only “one customer”.